Prayers Of The Faithful – November 29

For Pope Francis and Bishop Christian whose clear preaching calls us to Advent hope during this difficult time in our world.
We pray to the Lord.

For our country as we listen to debate on a new bill for assisted suicide that promotes death for all ages and for the mentally ill.
We pray to the Lord.

For people overwhelmed by the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, especially those in our province and in Saint John.
We pray to the Lord.

For people and families who are homeless or facing eviction and for all the poor and people facing loss of jobs and income.
We pray to the Lord.

For the many generous people working to provide for the poor this Christmas.
We pray to the Lord.

For people who are sick and for their families and caregivers and for people in isolation who are facing fear and loneliness and discouragement each day during the pandemic.
We pray to the Lord.

For those who have died: Paul Von Richter, Bruce McCanse, Mary Lou Cronin, Margie Conway, Karen Legere, that God will grant them the joy of heaven.
We pray to the Lord.

Introduction – Prayers Of The Faithful

Bishop Christian’s Advent letter is very welcome in the midst of a second COVID “wave” breaking over our province. His invitation to a joyful expectation and joyful hope capture the message of the gospel and the thrust of all our salvation history.

For those of us of a certain age the season of expectation began a few weeks before the start of Advent. It usually started with the arrival of Eaton’s Christmas catalogue. Whether it was toys that allowed boys and girls to imagine their future in traditional roles and occupations or skates and sleighs that promised the same fun and delight for all, it didn’t matter if the probability of receiving such wonderful things was very low. The reality was often determined by family size and finances and whether the port and drydock were at full employment. Still the dreams and expectations allowed young hearts and souls to believe that good things and a better future were possible.

The time spent with Christ in prayer or adoration or expectation or just embracing His comfort in our uncertainty or loneliness or fear makes our hope real. We can expect to receive what He promises to give and bring us especially if it is not exactly what we expected or imagined.